Why Fat Pad?

October 25, 2017 - 2 minutes read

FAT PADS

Fat pads occur on the thriftiest animals that naturally have a predominance for more gradual glucose dispersal and higher insulin secretion. Geared as they are to undergo deprivation, or when Insulin Resistant and are not able to get glucose into cells, they lay down protected and hard-to-reabsorb fat deposits in non-challenging spaces in the body when they get the opportunity to encounter periods of better nutrition.

Fat pads are not just deposits of fats; they are also full of supportive hormones, lymph, plaque and the wastes of chemicals because of the complex interrelationship between lipids, glucose and the metabolism that initiates the fat pads in the first place. All are cradled in synovial fluid which gives them their upstanding appearance in some cases, as if they can slide around.

Abnormal fat deposits (known as regional adiposity) characterizes Equine Metabolic Syndrome, as does obesity and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the inability of normal insulin concentrations to stimulate tissues to uptake glucose. When a horse eats foods containing some sugar or starches, glucose enters the blood and this stimulates the pancreas to release insulin. When insulin attaches to insulin receptors, found on many cells in the body (muscle, fat, liver, heart) glucose can leave the bloodstream and enter the cell

With insulin resistance, the cells become resistant to insulin – normal amounts of insulin are no longer sufficient and therefore the pancreas must compensate by releasing increased amounts of insulin to move the glucose into the cells, to prevent blood glucose levels becoming too high (hyperglycaemia).

TRINITY FORMULAE TO FEED

To help with Fat Pad reabsorption and clearance by the horse or pony feed L94 for the first 10 days followed by REXFLO for the next 20 days and thereafter for the next 20 days till clear especially if there is any perceived risk of Laminitis.